East Cardinal Direction Marker and the US Capitol

East Cardinal Direction Marker and the US Capitol

Stop and Listen

East Cardinal Marker

East Cardinal Marker

U.S. Capitol

U.S. Capitol

About

This stone came from Sugarloaf Mountain in Maryland and represents the east. The museum faces toward the east and the U.S. Capitol building.

East Cardinal Direction Marker

An Audio Transcript

This stone, made of quartzite, came from Sugarloaf Mountain in the Monocacy Valley near Dickerson, Maryland. It was blessed and brought here by the Maryland and Virginia Tribes. Karenne Wood is from the Monacan Indian Nation in Virginia.

Grandfather Creator, I address you and these sacred stones as our elders here today. This is your child - - of the Monacan people, the asa. We ask that you bless us as we stand together with one mind. … We welcome these stones here today and ask them to feel good among us. We ask the spirits of the stones to stay strong among us and protect us. We ask our grandparents to guide us on our path. We ask them for humility. We ask them to bless this place and our stories.

U.S. Capitol

An Audio Transcript

Look toward the Capitol. Again here's Duane Blue Spruce.

"I think the first impression I get when I see the relationship between the National Museum of the American Indian and the US Capitol is a great sense of pride both personally and culturally. You know, as a Native person, this museum very much represents many peoples and in that way it's a symbol and an icon. I don't think we can overstate, sort of the symbolic aspects of this museum."