#SAMYSL Andrew Burkhardt on Double Elvis

#SAMYSL Andrew Burkhardt on Double Elvis

Andy Warhol, Double Elvis

Fashion designer Andrew Burkhardt speaks on Andy Warhol's Double Elvis.

Andy Warhol, Double Elvis

Andy Warhol, Double Elvis

LOW/NO VISION

LOW/NO VISION

Transcript

My name is Andrew Burkhardt and I'm from Seattle, Washington, and I am a model agent and designer.

For My Favorite Things, I chose Andy Warhol's Double Elvis. It's one of my favorite pieces in the museum, both because I love the piece of art, and I love Andy Warhol and what he did for art. What I love about this is that that it's very American. The whole time period for art in America post second world war, in the 60s, American artists were completely taking a different direction with art and I find that it's inspiring. It speaks about the idea of celebrity, it's very modern, I love the color, I love all the texture that you see when you look at it sideways.

This piece connects to the YSL exhibit in the sense that, like YSL, Andy Warhol was trying to see things in a different way. French design before YSL was very secluded, it was very exclusive, and he was one of the first designers, if not the first to say, this kind of clothing should be available to everyone.He took his haute couture pieces and basically knocked them off, he made the designs a lot cheaper and he started the Rive Gauche line. And that was hugely controversial because the people who could afford couture were saying, Why should just anyone be able to buy these clothes, but YSL wanted to make them accessible and I think that's how it's similar.

This piece was one of 22 pieces that were produced for a gallery exhibit in LA in 1963. And Andy Warhol just sent basically a huge long canvas with frames to the gallery and said, cut these however you want to, just make sure that they're all grouped together. I love that sort of irreverent approach to art and I think it's how he and other artists of the time kind of changed how we view art, made it much more accessible and much more for every person. He came back in the 70s and added the second panel, which leads you to think that he was thinking about his artwork, and how, he could improve it.

Warhol, who took art, and essentially commercialized it, he sort of brought the two worlds together, and it's very useful for someone like me.Because on the one hand, you want to do something that's amazing, maybe because of the line or the fabric, or just pure expression, but on the other hand, you want it to be accessible to people.

Looking at this piece, think about how it reflects on the idea of celebrity. This piece is really poignant for the time we live in now, where everyone is taking selfies, you know, Andy Warhol was the one who said that we're all going to be famous for fifteen minutes, and when he said that, I don't even think he even realized what was in store for future. Think about the world we live in as you look at this piece.

LOW/NO VISION Transcript

You are listening to a verbal description of the artwork intended for someone with low to no vision. An interpretive analysis will immediately follow. For interpretive analysis of the object, skip to the next track.

Double Elvis by Andy Warhol, left panel created in 1963 and right panel in 1976. Silkscreen ink and synthetic polymer paint on canvas. This artwork is made up of two panels, each about 7 feet tall by about 5 feet wide, together about 10 feet wide overall.

This is a diptych of two canvases placed next to each other to create a single image. The left canvas has two full-body portraits of a man printed in black on a silver background. The right canvas is entirely silver.

The canvas on the left features two identical side-by-side portraits of a man holding a gun. The man stands facing the viewer with his feet near the bottom edge of the canvas and his legs spread slightly further than shoulder width apart. The top of his hair is cut off by the top edge of the canvas. The man's right arm is bent toward the viewer, the hand holding a gun that points at the viewer slightly up and to his right. His left arm is frozen in midair as if just lifted from his side. The two images of the man are both incomplete; the left edge of the canvas cuts off the left portrait's right leg at the shin, while the right edge cuts the right portrait vertically in half.

The man wears boots and sturdy pants with a dark belt across his waist and a light button-up long sleeved shirt. Across his hips is a second belt, sagging on his right side where an empty holster loops around it. A baton is attached to the belt at his left hip. The top buttons of the man's shirt are undone, revealing flexed neck muscles. His face is mostly washed out with light, contrasting his dark hair and pupils, and the shadows between his eyes and eyebrows. His gaze is directed up and to his right, his head facing the viewer and turned slightly to his right.

The blank silver canvas on the right is positioned directly next to this first left canvas. The silver paint has been applied in uneven brush strokes resulting in areas of lighter and darker silver throughout the canvas.

Now, an interpretive analysis of this artwork.

My name is Andrew Burkhardt and I'm from Seattle, Washington, and I am a model agent and designer.

For My Favorite Things, I chose Andy Warhol's Double Elvis. It's one of my favorite pieces in the museum, both because I love the piece of art, and I love Andy Warhol and what he did for art. What I love about this is that that it's very American. The whole time period for art in America post second world war, in the 60s, American artists were completely taking a different direction with art and I find that it's inspiring. It speaks about the idea of celebrity, it's very modern, I love the color, I love all the texture that you see when you look at it sideways.

This piece connects to the YSL exhibit in the sense that, like YSL, Andy Warhol was trying to see things in a different way. French design before YSL was very secluded, it was very exclusive, and he was one of the first designers, if not the first to say, this kind of clothing should be available to everyone.He took his haute couture pieces and basically knocked them off, he made the designs a lot cheaper and he started the Rive Gauche line. And that was hugely controversial because the people who could afford couture were saying, Why should just anyone be able to buy these clothes, but YSL wanted to make them accessible and I think that's how it's similar.

This piece was one of 22 pieces that were produced for a gallery exhibit in LA in 1963. And Andy Warhol just sent basically a huge long canvas with frames to the gallery and said, cut these however you want to, just make sure that they're all grouped together. I love that sort of irreverent approach to art and I think it's how he and other artists of the time kind of changed how we view art, made it much more accessible and much more for every person. He came back in the 70s and added the second panel, which leads you to think that he was thinking about his artwork, and how, he could improve it.

Warhol, who took art, and essentially commercialized it, he sort of brought the two worlds together, and it's very useful for someone like me.Because on the one hand, you want to do something that's amazing, maybe because of the line or the fabric, or just pure expression, but on the other hand, you want it to be accessible to people.

Looking at this piece, think about how it reflects on the idea of celebrity. This piece is really poignant for the time we live in now, where everyone is taking selfies, you know, Andy Warhol was the one who said that we're all going to be famous for fifteen minutes, and when he said that, I don't even think he even realized what was in store for future. Think about the world we live in as you look at this piece.