#SAMDisguise Alejandro Guzman on Yoruban Twins

#SAMDisguise Alejandro Guzman on Yoruban Twins

Yoruban Twins

Artist Alejandro Guzman speaks on Commemorative twin figures from the Yoruba region of Nigeria.

Yoruban Twins

Yoruban Twins

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Transcript

Hello my name is Alejandro Guzman, I'm from Puerto Rico originally, I live in New York City, and here in Seattle to perform in the Disguise exhibition.

These are the twins, these are Yoruban, like typical household kind of twins that you have on your altars and stuff, and what's great about the Yoruban sensibility in their sculpture is always like the same as in Ghana and Kane's like, the heads always going off to the heavens. So that was like a real catalyst for me to create my sculptures in that kind of fashion as far as dealing with everyday life situations, trying to stay away from certain histories that people learn in American European art schools. And it's unique, I like how this now becomes just the norm of American art and its influences have hid the world within all processes of art making today.

So I think that's really important that on this side of the museum we have uh a collection ranging like within the last 100 years, 50 years, 10 years. And then with the Disguise exhibition, it's really what people are doing now across the continent and the Americas and Europe and Asia. Yeah I love that.

LOW/NO VISION Transcript

You are listening to a visual description of the artwork intended for someone with low to no vision. An interpretive analysis will immediately follow. For interpretive analysis of the object, enter the three-digit number on the label followed by the pound key.

Commemorative twin figures (Awon Ere Ibeji), by unknown Nigerian artists from the Yoruba, Oyo, and Ekiti regions. Wood. About 9 inches tall by 3 ΒΌ inches wide by 3 inches deep.

This is an installation of three pairs of wooden figures. Each pair has a male and female figure; the male on the left has a bare, flat chest and the female on the right has protruding formed breasts. They are all nude but the pair on the left both wears a strand of red beads as a necklace and a strand of red and white beads as a drooping belt. The pair of figures in the center wears no adornments, while the pair on the right wears a strand of dark red beads as a necklace. They all are carved in a similar style, each figure with hands on their hips and standing upright on a circular base. The level of detail ranges from mostly flat etching to pronounced carving of the facial features: large eyes, a long nose, and a closed-lipped mouth. The three pairs share the same tall hairstyle, the wood carved like a cone on top of the head, with etched lines that mark hair extending upward.

Now, an interpretive analysis of the artwork.

Hello my name is Alejandro Guzman, I'm from Puerto Rico originally, I live in New York City, and here in Seattle to perform in the Disguise exhibition.

These are the twins, these are Yoruban, like typical household kind of twins that you have on your altars and stuff, and what's great about the Yoruban sensibility in their sculpture is always like the same as in Ghana and Kane's like, the heads always going off to the heavens. So that was like a real catalyst for me to create my sculptures in that kind of fashion as far as dealing with everyday life situations, trying to stay away from certain histories that people learn in American European art schools. And it's unique, I like how this now becomes just the norm of American art and its influences have hid the world within all processes of art making today.

So I think that's really important that on this side of the museum we have uh a collection ranging like within the last 100 years, 50 years, 10 years. And then with the Disguise exhibition, it's really what people are doing now across the continent and the Americas and Europe and Asia. Yeah I love that.