#SAMYSL Tom Ordonio on Italian Room

#SAMYSL Tom Ordonio on Italian Room

Italian Room

Fashion designer Tom Ordonio speaks on the Italian Room.

Italian Room

Italian Room

LOW/NO VISION

LOW/NO VISION

Transcript

Hi my name is Tom Ordonio, I'm a women's ready-to-wear fashion designer in Seattle

I think this room connects to design in a lot of ways. When I approach my design I think, first of all, is it aesthetically pleasing, and second of all, how is a woman going to live in my clothing, and how she is going to experience her life in my clothing. And it's the same with this room, it's how did the people who lived here or how did the people who were in this room, how did they experience their lives?

Aesthetically this room is pretty simple, and that's sort of how I approach my design as well, it's very simple in a way but when you look at things closer, when you're in this room for an extended period of time, you, it's like an experience and it's like a journey and you end up seeing a lot of things that you wouldn't see if it wasn't such an immersive room. Just everything from the lighting in here, the woodwork, the ceiling. It's simple in a way, but at the same time serves a purpose as well, too

There's a simplicity and a beauty to this room, and there was a simplicity and a beauty to Yves Saint Laurent's work as well. I think that's where we sort of get our idea of classicism and classic in terms of clothing, a lot of it looks really simple, but when you look at the clothing, there are just really beautiful details and the way that it forms with the woman's body. When you really inspect this work, you really just get to see his thought process and how he felt about women and the way that he wanted to dress women.

When you come in here, how do you feel? What sort of emotions or what sort of feelings does an exhibit like this do for you?

LOW/NO VISION Transcript

You are listening to a visual description of the artwork intended for someone with low to no vision. An interpretive analysis will immediately follow. For interpretive analysis of the object, skip to the next track.

Italian Room, by an unknown artist. Created circa 1575-1600. Spruce, willow, and fir. About 14 feet 3 inches wide by 16 feet 8 inches deep.

This is a room with walls made of carved wood panels. Upon entering the room, the back wall is made of a simple white stone fireplace in the middle, flanked by carved columns with leafy capitals that extend to swirls and windows with circle glass panes which let in seemingly natural light.

The left wall of the room is made of carved rectangle panels alternating with the matching columns. The right wall features two display cases of porcelain dishes, separated by the same columns and rectangle panel between. The ceiling features the most ornate carvings. A vessel with a handle and spout on either side on top of an unrolling scroll with the letter R and leafy branches radiating behind it forms a center of this crest-like design. A wreath of flowers and leaves encircles the vessel. A broken circle of lines and ornamental leaves encircle the wreath and vessel, and rectangle border of flowers alternating with dots forms a frame around the entire design. The doorway to the room is in the center of the back wall, and is flanked by display cases of more porcelain dishes.

Now, an interpretive analysis of the artwork.

Hi my name is Tom Ordonio, I'm a women's ready-to-wear fashion designer in Seattle

I think this room connects to design in a lot of ways. When I approach my design I think, first of all, is it aesthetically pleasing, and second of all, how is a woman going to live in my clothing, and how she is going to experience her life in my clothing. And it's the same with this room, it's how did the people who lived here or how did the people who were in this room, how did they experience their lives?

Aesthetically this room is pretty simple, and that's sort of how I approach my design as well, it's very simple in a way but when you look at things closer, when you're in this room for an extended period of time, you, it's like an experience and it's like a journey and you end up seeing a lot of things that you wouldn't see if it wasn't such an immersive room. Just everything from the lighting in here, the woodwork, the ceiling. It's simple in a way, but at the same time serves a purpose as well, too

There's a simplicity and a beauty to this room, and there was a simplicity and a beauty to Yves Saint Laurent's work as well. I think that's where we sort of get our idea of classicism and classic in terms of clothing, a lot of it looks really simple, but when you look at the clothing, there are just really beautiful details and the way that it forms with the woman's body. When you really inspect this work, you really just get to see his thought process and how he felt about women and the way that he wanted to dress women.

When you come in here, how do you feel? What sort of emotions or what sort of feelings does an exhibit like this do for you?