Why Innovation?

Why Innovation?

Why Not Change? Or Reformation? Or Invention?

Innovation studies today, and the more recent phenomenon of disruptive innovation, are driven from the work of Schumpeter. 100 years after his initial work on the topic, innovation has fully shed its pejorative attributes. But how do we negotiate the entrepreneural aims with the spaces where we celebrate? Today, an increasing number of universities are dedicating staff and resources to innovation centers, innovation initiatives, and Chief Innovation Officers. The power of innovation is evident, but if we consider the research on innovation as an isolated concept without a shared conceptual space, what are the assumptions we push forward when we choose to focus on innovation.

Innovation and change are inextricably linked, but we focus on innovation as a concept and innovativeness as a trait rather than change. What are the other historical terms congruent to how we generalize innovation, how are they different from innovation, and why is innovation the term of the moment for educational institutions?